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General Rules for Writing a Proper Dissertation Problem Statement

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❶Still, our writers can also create theses on Business, Psychology, Marketing, Finance and many other subjects.

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Written in a lively and engaging style, this concise text helps students to structure their thesis in a clear, coherent and persuasive manner. Packed with ideas for structuring theses effectively, this practical guide will be invaluable to thesis writers of all disciplines. Learn more about this book. A good problem statement is based on a thoughtful problem definition and clearly indicates:. In addition to identifying your problem, you also need to set an objective that will guide your research and justify why it needs to be undertaken.

Your problem statement should be perfect now! Use the other checklist to further improve your thesis. Once you have written your problem statement, you are ready to create your main research question and related sub-questions. Although the problem statement and your main research question are closely linked, they are not the same thing. Some universities may combine the concepts of a problem statement and main research question.

Always take care that you are referring to the right item in your writing and when you communicate with your supervisor. Learn more about main research questions. She loves the challenge of finding the perfect formulation or wording and derives much satisfaction from helping students take their academic writing up a notch.

I'm facing difficult in writing problem statement on the topic below. Dear Guna, Thanks for your comment. Unfortunately, Scribbr cannot help you writing the problem statement. But you can find lots of tips on academic writing here: Thank you for your question!

Try to define a research problem about your topic: You can find more information on how to do that here. I am doing LLB and doing reasearch methodology as part of my studies. I need help with problem statement , i want to write about the impact of children born out of wedlock, the limitation and frustrations experienced by their fathers to access their children. Sounds like an interesting topic! Do you have a draft version yet?

Then we could take a look at it. You could also talk to us via the chat if you want. Have a thesis expert improve your writing. Check your thesis for plagiarism in 10 minutes. Generate your APA citations for free! Home Knowledge Base Dissertation roadmap How to write a problem statement for your dissertation. The process of boarding should be optimized for time-efficiency but also should be straightforward enough that it can be easily understood by all passengers.

In the words of the inventor Charles Kettering, "A problem well-stated is a problem half-solved. Succinctly summarize the problem you intend to solve — this cuts to the heart of the issue immediately and positions the most important information in the problem statement near the top, where it's most visible.

If you've just stated an "ideal" state of affairs as suggested above, you may want to start your sentence with phrasing like "However, Let's say that we think we've developed a quicker, more efficient system for getting passengers aboard our planes than the typical "back to front" seating system.

In this case, we might continue with a few sentences like, "However, ABC Airline's current passenger boarding system is an inefficient use of the company's time and resources.

By wasting employee man hours, the current boarding protocols make the company less competitive, and by contributing to a slow boarding process, they create an unfavorable brand image. Explain your problem's financial costs. Soon after you state your problem, you'll want to explain why it's a big deal — after all, no one has the time or resources to try to solve every single minor problem.

In the business world, money is almost always the bottom line, so you'll want to try to highlight the financial impact of your problem on the company or organization you're writing for. For instance, is the problem you're discussing keeping your business from making more money? Is it actively costing your business money? Is it damaging your brand image and thus indirectly costing your business money?

Be as exact and specific about the financial burden of your problem — try to specify an exact dollar amount or a well-supported estimate for your problem's cost. For our airline example, we might proceed to explain the problem's financial cost like this: On average, the current boarding system wastes roughly four minutes per boarding session, resulting in a total of 20 wasted man-hours per day across all ABC flights.

Back up your assertions. No matter how much money you claim your problem is costing your company, if you can't back up your claims with reasonable evidence, you may not be taken seriously.

As soon as you start making specific claims about how serious your problem is, you'll need to start supporting your statements with evidence. In some cases, this may be from your own research, from data from a related study or project, or even from reputable third-party sources. In some corporate and academic situations, you may need to explicitly reference your evidence in the text of your problem statement, while in other situations, it may be enough to simply use a footnote or another form of shorthand for your citations.

If you're unsure, ask your boss or teacher for advice. Let's reexamine the sentences we used in the previous step. They describe the cost of the problem, but don't explain how this cost was found.

A more thorough explanation might include this: Based on internal performance tracking data, [1] on average, the current boarding system wastes roughly four minutes per boarding session, resulting in a total of 20 wasted man-hours per day across all ABC flights. When you've explained what the problem is and why it's so important, proceed to explain how you propose to deal with it.

As with the initial statement of your problem, your explanation of your solution should be written to be as clear and concise as possible. Stick to big, important, concrete concepts and leave any minor details for later — you'll have plenty of opportunities to get into every minor aspect of your proposed solution in the body of your proposal. In our airline example, our solution to the problem of inefficient boarding practices is this new system we've discovered, so we should briefly explain the broad strokes of this new system without getting into the minor details.

We might say something like, "Using a modified boarding system proposed by Dr. Edward Right of the Kowlard Business Efficiency Institute which has passengers board the plane from the sides in rather than from the back to the front, ABC Airlines can eliminate these four minutes of waste.

Explain the benefits of the solution. Again, now that you've told your readers what should be done about the problem, it's a very good idea to explain why this solution is a good idea. Since businesses are always trying to increase their efficiency and earn more money, you'll want to focus primarily on the financial impact of your solution — which expenses it will reduce, which new forms of revenue it will generate, and so on.

You can also explain non-tangible benefits, like improved customer satisfaction, but your total explanation shouldn't be too much longer than a few sentences to a paragraph. In our example, we might briefly describe how our company could conceivably benefit from the money saved with our solution. A few sentences along these lines might work: In addition, by being the first American airline to adopt this solution, ABC stands to gain considerable recognition as an industry trend-setter in the areas of value and convenience.

Conclude by summarizing the problem and solution. After you've presented the ideal vision for your company, identified the problem keeping your from achieving this ideal, and suggested a solution, you're almost done. All that's left to do is to conclude with a summary of your main arguments that allows you transition easily into the main body of your proposal.

There's no need to make this conclusion any longer than it needs to be — try to state, in just a few sentences, the basic gist of what you've described in your problem statement and the approach you intend to take in the body of the article. In our airline example, we might conclude like this: In this proposal, the alternative boarding protocols developed by Dr. Right are analyzed for their feasibility and steps for effective implementation are suggested.

For academic work, don't forget a thesis statement. When you have to write a problem statement for school, rather than for work, the process will be largely the same, but there may be extra items you'll need to take into account to assure a good grade. For instance, many composition classes will require you to include a thesis statement in your problem statement.

The thesis statement sometimes just called the "thesis" is a single sentence that summarizes your entire argument, boiling it down to its bare essentials.

A good thesis statement identifies both the problem and the solution as succinctly and clearly as possible. As our thesis statement, we might use this sentence, which acknowledges the problem and the solution we're about to propose: Other times, you'll have more freedom — check with your teacher if you're not sure.

Follow the same process for conceptual problems. Not all problem statements are going to be for documents dealing with practical, tangible problems. Some, especially in academics and especially in the humanities , are going to deal with conceptual problems — problems that have to do with the way we think about abstract ideas. In these cases, you can still use the same basic problem statement framework to present the problem at hand while obviously shifting away from a business focus.

In other words, you'll want to identify the problem often, for conceptual problems, this will be that some idea is not well-understood , explain why the problem matters, explain how you plan to solve it, and sum up all of this in a conclusion.

For instance, let's say that we're asked to write a problem statement for a report on the importance of religious symbolism in The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky. In this case, our problem statement should identify some poorly-understood aspect of the religious symbolism in the novel, explain why this matters for instance, we might say that by better understanding the religious symbolism in the novel, it's possible to draw new insights from the book , and lay out how we plan to support our argument.

If there's one thing to keep in mind when writing problem statements, it's this. Problem statements shouldn't be any longer than they need to be to accomplish their task of laying out the problem and its solution for the reader. No sentence should be wasted. Any sentence that doesn't directly contribute to the problem statement's goals should be removed.

Use clear, direct language. Don't get bogged down in minor details — problem statements should deal only with the essentials of your problem and solution. In general, keep your problem statement as short as possible without sacrificing its informativeness. A problem statement is no place to add your own personal commentary or "flavor", as this makes the problem statement longer for no practical purpose.

You may or may not have the opportunity to be more long-winded in the body of your document, depending on the seriousness of your topic and audience.

Write for your audience. When making a problem statement, it's important to remember that you're writing for someone else, not for yourself.

Different audiences will have different sets of knowledge, different reasons for reading, and different attitudes toward your problem, so try to keep your intended audience in mind as you write. You want your problem statement to be as clear and easy for your audience to understand as possible, which means you may need to change your tone, style, and diction from one audience to another.

As you write, try to ask yourself questions like: Don't use jargon without defining it. As noted above, your problem statement should be written so that it's as easy for your audience to understand as possible. This means that, unless you're writing for a technical audience that is likely to be knowledgeable in the terminology of the field you're writing about, you'll want to avoid using technical jargon too heavily and to make sure that you define any pieces of jargon that you do use.

Never make the assumption that your audience automatically has all of the technical knowledge that you do or you risk alienating them and losing readers as soon as they encounter terms and information they're not familiar with.

For instance, if we're writing for a board of highly-educated physicians, it may be OK to assume that they'll know what the term "metacarpal" means. However, if we're writing to an audience made up of both physicians and wealthy hospital investors who may or may not be medically trained, it's a good idea to introduce the word "metacarpal" with its definition — the bone between the first two joints of the finger.

Stick to a narrow, defined problem. The best problem statements aren't sprawling, rambling pieces of writing. Instead, they're focused on a single, easily-identified problem and its solution.

Generally, narrow, defined topics are easier to write convincingly about than large, vague ones, so whenever possible, you'll want to keep the scope of your problem statement and thus the body of your document well-focused. If this makes your problem statement or the body of your document short, this is usually a good thing except in academic situations where you have minimum page limits for your assignment.

A good rule of thumb is to only address problems that you can definitively solve beyond a shadow of a doubt. If you're not sure of a definitive solution that can solve your entire problem, you may want to narrow the scope of your project and change your problem statement to reflect this new focus.

To keep the scope of a problem statement under control, it can be helpful to wait until after completing the body of the document or proposal to write the problem statement. In this case, when we write our problem statement, we can use our actual document as a guideline so that we don't have to guess about the ground we may cover when we write it. Remember the "five Ws".

Problem statements should be as informative as possible in as few words as possible, but shouldn't delve into minute details. If you're ever in doubt of what to include in your problem statement, a smart idea is to try to answer the five Ws who, what, where, when, and why , plus how.

Addressing the five Ws gives your reader a good baseline level of knowledge to understand the problem and solution without treading into unnecessary levels of detail.

For instance, if you're writing a problem statement to propose a new building development to your local city council, you might address the five Ws by explaining who the development would benefit, what the development would require, where the development should be, when construction should begin, and why the development is ultimately a smart idea for the city.

Use a formal voice. Problem statements are almost always used for serious proposals and projects. Because of this, you'll want to use a formal, dignified writing style the same as the style hopefully used for the body of the document in the problem statement. Keep your writing clear, plain, and direct. Don't attempt to win your reader over by taking a friendly or casual tone in your problem statement. Don't use humor or jokes.

Don't include pointless asides or anecdotes. Don't use slang or colloquialisms. Good problem statements know that they have a job to accomplish and don't waste any time or ink on unnecessary content.

The closest you can usually get to including purely "entertaining" content in academic writing in the humanities. Here, occasionally, it's possible to encounter problem statements that begin with a quote or epigraph.

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Dec 02,  · Before you write a problem statement, you should always define the problem that you will address in your dissertation.. See an example of a problem definition. You need it for two main reasons: The problem statement is the stepping-stone to your main research jctgkzv.ml you haven’t identified a problem, you cannot formulate the question you will explore/5().

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Writing the Problem Statement for Your Dissertation. By William G. Wargo, Who will care about the problem? When your problem statement is vague or unrealistic, it is very difficult to get your chairperson and committee members interested enough to care about our dissertation research. Writing Dissertation Conclusions in Your Chapter.

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Custom writing service well that scholars convey original ideas and messages. Would you need to a good one then you are able let the dissertation with dissertation writing for payment problem statement regular or immediate deadline sit on the shelf because something with a more concrete deadline class on a specific date for example seems. We are talking of the dissertation problem statement writing guide, which you are reading right here, right now. they are unable to pay attention to or acquire the skills necessary to lead the gifted children in their classrooms.” In this problem statement, the problem is the fact that school teachers of Springfield are unable to lead.

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Finding A Dissertation Problem Statement Example. Pay close attention to the length of the problem statement and how it is introduced and explained in order to get a good idea of what will be expected of you. This will ensure that you are setting yourself up for writing the best problem statement for your dissertation. General Rules for Writing a Proper Dissertation Problem Statement A problem statement is the first thing the committee members will read in your dissertation. This section will help them understand your reasons for studying this question in particular and persuade that this study is really worth the effort.